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     ——  外语解密学习法 逆读法(Reverse Reading Method)   解读法(Decode-Reading Method)训练范文 ——                 

                                       解密目标语言:英语                                  解密辅助语言:汉语
                                       Language to be decoded:  English              Auxiliary Language :  Chinese  
  
                                       解密文本:     《战争与和平》  [俄] 列夫 · 托尔斯泰 原著    

    


               Война и мир            
               автор  Лев Толстой    

                                                                                               

                                                  War and Peace            
                                          by Leo Tolstoy 

                                         Book One   Part One 

 

                                                    
 
Ch1 · Ch2 · Ch3 · Ch4 · Ch5  · Ch6 · Ch7 · Ch8 · Ch9 · Ch10  · Ch11 · Ch12 · Ch13 · Ch14 · Ch15 · Ch16 · Ch17 · Ch18 · Ch19 · Ch20 · Ch21 · Ch22 ·  Ch23 · Ch24 · Ch25    

       Part Two        Part Three         Book II        Book II        Book IV      Epilogue                                                      

    
                                                    
        俄汉对照(Russian & Chinese)                                    俄英对照(Russian & English)                               英汉对照(English & Chinese)
    


   

                         Chapter 1       < Book One · Part One >    

 "Well, Prince, so Genoa and Lucca are now just family estates of the Buonapartes. But I warn you, if you don't tell me that this means war, if you still try to defend the infamies and horrors perpetrated by that Antichrist--I really believe he is Antichrist--I will have nothing more to do with you and you are no longer my friend, no longer my 'faithful slave,' as you call yourself! But how do you do? I see I have frightened you--sit down and tell me all the news."

It was in July, 1805, and the speaker was the well-known Anna Pavlovna Scherer, maid of honor and favorite of the Empress Marya Fedorovna. With these words she greeted Prince Vasili Kuragin, a man of high rank and importance, who was the first to arrive at her reception. Anna Pavlovna had had a cough for some days. She was, as she said, suffering from la grippe; grippe being then a new word in St. Petersburg, used only by the elite.

All her invitations without exception, written in French, and delivered by a scarlet-liveried footman that morning, ran as follows:

"If you have nothing better to do, Count [or Prince], and if the prospect of spending an evening with a poor invalid is not too terrible, I shall be very charmed to see you tonight between 7 and 10- Annette Scherer."

"Heavens! what a virulent attack!" replied the prince, not in the least disconcerted by this reception. He had just entered, wearing an embroidered court uniform, knee breeches, and shoes, and had stars on his breast and a serene expression on his flat face. He spoke in that refined French in which our grandfathers not only spoke but thought, and with the gentle, patronizing intonation natural to a man of importance who had grown old in society and at court. He went up to Anna Pavlovna, kissed her hand, presenting to her his bald, scented, and shining head, and complacently seated himself on the sofa.

"First of all, dear friend, tell me how you are. Set your friend's mind at rest," said he without altering his tone, beneath the politeness and affected sympathy of which indifference and even irony could be discerned.

"Can one be well while suffering morally? Can one be calm in times like these if one has any feeling?" said Anna Pavlovna. "You are staying the whole evening, I hope?"

"And the fete at the English ambassador's? Today is Wednesday. I must put in an appearance there," said the prince. "My daughter is coming for me to take me there."

"I thought today's fete had been canceled. I confess all these festivities and fireworks are becoming wearisome."

"If they had known that you wished it, the entertainment would have been put off," said the prince, who, like a wound-up clock, by force of habit said things he did not even wish to be believed.

"Don't tease! Well, and what has been decided about Novosiltsev's dispatch? You know everything."

"What can one say about it?" replied the prince in a cold, listless tone. "What has been decided? They have decided that Buonaparte has burnt his boats, and I believe that we are ready to burn ours."

Prince Vasili always spoke languidly, like an actor repeating a stale part. Anna Pavlovna Scherer on the contrary, despite her forty years, overflowed with animation and impulsiveness. To be an enthusiast had become her social vocation and, sometimes even when she did not feel like it, she became enthusiastic in order not to disappoint the expectations of those who knew her. The subdued smile which, though it did not suit her faded features, always played round her lips expressed, as in a spoiled child, a continual consciousness of her charming defect, which she neither wished, nor could, nor considered it necessary, to correct.

In the midst of a conversation on political matters Anna Pavlovna burst out:

"Oh, don't speak to me of Austria. Perhaps I don't understand things, but Austria never has wished, and does not wish, for war. She is betraying us! Russia alone must save Europe. Our gracious sovereign recognizes his high vocation and will be true to it. That is the one thing I have faith in! Our good and wonderful sovereign has to perform the noblest role on earth, and he is so virtuous and noble that God will not forsake him. He will fulfill his vocation and crush the hydra of revolution, which has become more terrible than ever in the person of this murderer and villain! We alone must avenge the blood of the just one.... Whom, I ask you, can we rely on?... England with her commercial spirit will not and cannot understand the Emperor Alexander's loftiness of soul. She has refused to evacuate Malta. She wanted to find, and still seeks, some secret motive in our actions. What answer did Novosiltsev get? None. The English have not understood and cannot understand the self-abnegation of our Emperor who wants nothing for himself, but only desires the good of mankind. And what have they promised? Nothing! And what little they have promised they will not perform! Prussia has always declared that Buonaparte is invincible, and that all Europe is powerless before him.... And I don't believe a word that Hardenburg says, or Haugwitz either. This famous Prussian neutrality is just a trap. I have faith only in God and the lofty destiny of our adored monarch. He will save Europe!"

She suddenly paused, smiling at her own impetuosity.

"I think," said the prince with a smile, "that if you had been sent instead of our dear Wintzingerode you would have captured the King of Prussia's consent by assault. You are so eloquent. Will you give me a cup of tea?"

"In a moment. A propos," she added, becoming calm again, "I am expecting two very interesting men tonight, le Vicomte de Mortemart, who is connected with the Montmorencys through the Rohans, one of the best French families. He is one of the genuine emigres, the good ones. And also the Abbe Morio. Do you know that profound thinker? He has been received by the Emperor. Had you heard?"

"I shall be delighted to meet them," said the prince. "But tell me," he added with studied carelessness as if it had only just occurred to him, though the question he was about to ask was the chief motive of his visit, "is it true that the Dowager Empress wants Baron Funke to be appointed first secretary at Vienna? The baron by all accounts is a poor creature."

Prince Vasili wished to obtain this post for his son, but others were trying through the Dowager Empress Marya Fedorovna to secure it for the baron.

Anna Pavlovna almost closed her eyes to indicate that neither she nor anyone else had a right to criticize what the Empress desired or was pleased with.

"Baron Funke has been recommended to the Dowager Empress by her sister," was all she said, in a dry and mournful tone.

As she named the Empress, Anna Pavlovna's face suddenly assumed an expression of profound and sincere devotion and respect mingled with sadness, and this occurred every time she mentioned her illustrious patroness. She added that Her Majesty had deigned to show Baron Funke beaucoup d'estime, and again her face clouded over with sadness.

The prince was silent and looked indifferent. But, with the womanly and courtierlike quickness and tact habitual to her, Anna Pavlovna wished both to rebuke him (for daring to speak he had done of a man recommended to the Empress) and at the same time to console him, so she said:

"Now about your family. Do you know that since your daughter came out everyone has been enraptured by her? They say she is amazingly beautiful."

The prince bowed to signify his respect and gratitude.

"I often think," she continued after a short pause, drawing nearer to the prince and smiling amiably at him as if to show that political and social topics were ended and the time had come for intimate conversation--"I often think how unfairly sometimes the joys of life are distributed. Why has fate given you two such splendid children? I don't speak of Anatole, your youngest. I don't like him," she added in a tone admitting of no rejoinder and raising her eyebrows. "Two such charming children. And really you appreciate them less than anyone, and so you don't deserve to have them."

And she smiled her ecstatic smile.

"I can't help it," said the prince. "Lavater would have said I lack the bump of paternity."

"Don't joke; I mean to have a serious talk with you. Do you know I am dissatisfied with your younger son? Between ourselves" (and her face assumed its melancholy expression), "he was mentioned at Her Majesty's and you were pitied...."

The prince answered nothing, but she looked at him significantly, awaiting a reply. He frowned.

"What would you have me do?" he said at last. "You know I did all a father could for their education, and they have both turned out fools. Hippolyte is at least a quiet fool, but Anatole is an active one. That is the only difference between them." He said this smiling in a way more natural and animated than usual, so that the wrinkles round his mouth very clearly revealed something unexpectedly coarse and unpleasant.

"And why are children born to such men as you? If you were not a father there would be nothing I could reproach you with," said Anna Pavlovna, looking up pensively.

"I am your faithful slave and to you alone I can confess that my children are the bane of my life. It is the cross I have to bear. That is how I explain it to myself. It can't be helped!"

He said no more, but expressed his resignation to cruel fate by a gesture. Anna Pavlovna meditated.

"Have you never thought of marrying your prodigal son Anatole?" she asked. "They say old maids have a mania for matchmaking, and though I don't feel that weakness in myself as yet, I know a little person who is very unhappy with her father. She is a relation of yours, Princess Mary Bolkonskaya."

Prince Vasili did not reply, though, with the quickness of memory and perception befitting a man of the world, he indicated by a movement of the head that he was considering this information.

"Do you know," he said at last, evidently unable to check the sad current of his thoughts, "that Anatole is costing me forty thousand rubles a year? And," he went on after a pause, "what will it be in five years, if he goes on like this?" Presently he added: "That's what we fathers have to put up with.... Is this princess of yours rich?"

"Her father is very rich and stingy. He lives in the country. He is the well-known Prince Bolkonski who had to retire from the army under the late Emperor, and was nicknamed 'the King of Prussia.' He is very clever but eccentric, and a bore. The poor girl is very unhappy. She has a brother; I think you know him, he married Lise Meinen lately. He is an aide-de-camp of Kutuzov's and will be here tonight."

"Listen, dear Annette," said the prince, suddenly taking Anna Pavlovna's hand and for some reason drawing it downwards. "Arrange that affair for me and I shall always be your most devoted slave- slafe with an f, as a village elder of mine writes in his reports. She is rich and of good family and that's all I want."

And with the familiarity and easy grace peculiar to him, he raised the maid of honor's hand to his lips, kissed it, and swung it to and fro as he lay back in his armchair, looking in another direction.

"Attendez," said Anna Pavlovna, reflecting, "I'll speak to Lise, young Bolkonski's wife, this very evening, and perhaps the thing can be arranged. It shall be on your family's behalf that I'll start my apprenticeship as old maid."

          第一章     <第一卷 · 第一部> 

 “啊,公爵,热那亚和卢加现在是波拿巴家族的领地,不过,我得事先对您说,如果您不对我说我们这里处于战争状态,如果您还敢袒护这个基督的敌人(我确乎相信,他是一个基督的敌人)的种种卑劣行径和他一手造成的灾祸,那么我就不再管您了。您就不再是我的朋友,您就不再是,如您所说的,我的忠实的奴隶。啊,您好,您好。我看我正在吓唬您了,请坐,讲给我听。”
  一八零五年七月,遐迩闻名的安娜·帕夫洛夫娜·舍列尔——皇后玛丽亚·费奥多罗夫娜的宫廷女官和心腹,在欢迎首位莅临晚会的达官显要瓦西里公爵时说过这番话。安娜·帕夫洛夫娜一连咳嗽几天了。正如她所说,她身罹流行性感冒(那时候,流行性感冒是个新词,只有少数人才用它)。清早由一名红衣听差在分别发出的便函中,千篇一律地写道:“伯爵(或公爵),如您意下尚无任何可取的娱乐,如今日晚上这个可怜的女病人的症候不致使您过分惧怕,则请于七时至十时间莅临寒舍,不胜雀跃。安娜·舍列尔。”
  “我的天,大打出手,好不激烈!”一位进来的公爵答道,对这种接见丝毫不感到困惑,他穿着绣花的宫廷礼服、长统袜子、短靴皮鞋,佩戴着多枚明星勋章,扁平的面部流露出愉快的表情。
  他讲的是优雅的法语,我们的祖辈不仅借助它来说话,而且借助它来思考,他说起话来带有很平静的、长辈庇护晚辈时特有的腔调,那是上流社会和宫廷中德高望重的老年人独具的语调。他向安娜·帕夫洛夫娜跟前走来,把那洒满香水的闪闪发亮的秃头凑近她,吻吻她的手,就心平气和地坐到沙发上。
  “亲爱的朋友,请您首先告诉我,身体可好吗?您让我安静下来,”他说道,嗓音并没有改变,透过他那讲究礼貌的、关怀备至的腔调可以看出冷淡的、甚至是讥讽的意味。
  “当你精神上遭受折磨时,身体上怎么能够健康呢?……在我们这个时代,即令有感情,又怎么能够保持宁静呢?”安娜·帕夫洛夫娜说道,“我希望您整个晚上都待在我这儿,好吗?”
  “英国公使的喜庆日子呢?今日是星期三,我要在那里露面,”公爵说道,“我女儿顺便来接我,坐一趟车子。”
  “我以为今天的庆祝会取消了。老实说,所有这些庆祝会、烟火,都令人厌恶极了。”
  “若是人家知道您有这种心愿,庆祝会就得取消的。”公爵说道,他俨然像一架上紧发条的钟,习惯地说些他不想要别人相信的话。
  “请您不要折磨我。哦,他们就诺沃西利采夫的紧急情报作出了什么决议?这一切您了若指掌。 ”
  “怎么对您说好呢?”公爵说道,他的语调冷淡,索然无味。“决定了什么?他们决定:波拿巴既已焚烧自己的战船,看来我们也要准备这样做。”
  瓦西里公爵向来是慢吞吞地说话,像演员口中道出旧台词那样。安娜·帕夫洛夫娜·舍列尔虽说是年满四十,却反而充满活力和激情。
  她满腔热情,使她取得了社会地位。有时她甚至没有那种希冀,但为不辜负熟悉她的人们的期望,她还是要做一个满腔热情的人。安娜·帕夫洛夫娜脸上经常流露的冷淡的微笑,虽与她的憔悴的面容不相称,但却像娇生惯养的孩童那样,表示她经常意识到自己的微小缺点,不过她不想,也无法而且认为没有必要去把它改正。
  在有关政治行动的谈话当中,安娜·帕夫洛夫娜的心情激昂起来。
  “咳!请您不要对我谈论奥地利了!也许我什么都不明白,可是奥地利从来不需要,现在也不需要战争。它把我们出卖了。唯独俄罗斯才应当成为欧洲的救星。我们的恩人知道自己的崇高天职,他必将信守不渝。这就是我唯一的信条。我们慈善的国君当前需要发挥世界上至为伟大的职能。他十分善良,道德高尚,上帝决不会把他抛弃,他必将履行自己的天职,镇压革命的邪恶势力;他如今竟以这个杀手和恶棍作为代表人物,革命就显得愈益可怖了。遵守教规者付出了鲜血,唯独我们才应该讨还这一笔血债。我们要仰赖谁呢?我问您……散布着商业气息的英国决不懂得,也没法懂得亚历山大皇帝品性的高尚。美国拒绝让出马耳他。它想窥看,并且探寻我们行动的用意。他们对诺沃西利采夫说了什么话?……什么也没说。他们不理解,也没法理解我们皇帝的奋不顾身精神,我们皇帝丝毫不贪图私利,他心中总想为全世界造福。他们许诺了什么?什么也没有。他们的许诺,将只是一纸空文!普鲁士已经宣布,说波拿巴无敌于天下,整个欧洲都无能同他作对……我一点也不相信哈登贝格·豪格维茨的鬼话。普鲁士的这种臭名昭著的中立,只是个陷阱。我只相信上帝,相信我们的贤明君主的高贵命运。他一定能够拯救欧洲!……”她忽然停了下来,对她自己的激昂情绪流露出讥讽的微笑。
  “我认为,”公爵面露微笑地说道,“假如不委派我们这个可爱的温岑格罗德,而是委派您,您就会迫使普鲁士国王达成协议。您真是个能言善辩的人。给我斟点茶,好吗?”
  “我马上把茶端来。顺带提一句,”她又心平气和地补充说,“今天在这儿有两位饶有风趣的人士,一位是莫特马尔子爵,借助罗昂家的关系,已同蒙莫朗西结成亲戚,法国优秀的家族之一。他是侨民之中的一个名副其实的佼佼者。另一位则是莫里约神甫。您认识这位聪明透顶的人士么?国王接见过他了。您知道吗?”
  “啊!我将会感到非常高兴,”公爵说道,“请您告诉我,”他补充说,仿佛他方才想起某件事,显露出不经心的神态,而他所要问的事情,正是他来拜谒的主要鹄的。“皇太后想委派斗克男爵出任维也纳的头等秘书,真有其事吗?这公爵似乎是个卑微的人。”瓦西里公爵想把儿子安插到这个职位上,而大家却在千方百计地通过玛丽亚·费奥多罗夫娜为男爵谋到这个职位。
 
  安娜·帕夫洛夫娜几乎阖上了眼睛,暗示无论是她,或是任何人都不能断定,皇太后乐意或者喜欢做什么事。
  “斗克男爵是由太后的妹妹向太后推荐的。”她只是用悲哀的、冷冰冰的语调说了这句话。当安娜·帕夫洛夫娜说到太后的名字时,她脸上顿时流露出无限忠诚和十分敬重的表情,而且混杂有每次谈话中提到她的至高无上的庇护者时就会表现出来的忧悒情绪。她说,太后陛下对斗克男爵十分尊重,于是她的目光又笼罩着一抹愁云。
  公爵不开腔了,现出了冷漠的神态。安娜·帕夫洛夫娜本身具备有廷臣和女人的那种灵活和麻利的本能,待人接物有分寸,她心想抨击公爵,因为他胆敢肆意评论那个推荐给太后的人,而同时又安慰公爵。
  “顺便谈谈您的家庭情况吧,”她说道,“您知道吗?自从您女儿抛头露面,进入交际界以来,她是整个上流社会的宠物。大家都认为她是娇艳的美人。”
      公爵深深地鞠躬,表示尊敬和谢意。
  “我常有这样的想法,”安娜·帕夫洛夫娜在沉默须臾之后继续说道,她将身子凑近公爵,对他露出亲切的微笑,仿佛在表示,政界和交际界的谈话已经结束,现在可以开始推心置腹地交谈,“我常有这样的想法,生活上的幸福有时安排得不公平。为什么命运之神赐予您这么两个可爱的孩子(除开您的小儿子阿纳托利,我不喜欢他),”她扬起眉毛,断然地插上一句话,“为什么命运之神赐予您这么两个顶好的孩子呢?可是您真的不珍惜他们,所以您不配有这么两个孩子。”
  她于是兴奋地莞然一笑。
  “怎么办呢?拉法特会说我没有父爱的骨相,”公爵说道。
  “请不要再开玩笑。我想和您认真地谈谈。您知道,我不满意您的小儿子。对这些话请别介意,就在我们之间说说吧(她脸上带有忧悒的表情),大家在太后跟前议论他,都对您表示惋惜……”
  公爵不回答,但她沉默地、有所暗示地望着他,等待他回答。瓦西里公爵皱了一阵眉头。
  “我该怎样办呢?”他终于说道。“您知道,为教育他们,我已竭尽为父的应尽的能事,可是到头来两个都成了笨蛋,伊波利特充其量是个温顺的笨蛋,阿纳托利却是个惴惴不安的笨蛋。这就是二人之间唯一的差异。”他说道,笑得比平常更不自然,更兴奋,同时嘴角边起了皱褶,特别强烈地显得出人意料地粗暴和可憎。
 为什么像您这种人要生儿女呢?如果您不当父亲,我就无话可责备您了。”安娜·帕夫洛夫娜说道,若有所思地抬起眼睛。
  “我是您的忠实的奴隶,我只能向您一人坦白承认。我的孩子们是我的生活负担。这就是我的苦难。我是这样自我解释的。怎么办呢? ……”他默不作声,用手势表示他听从残酷命运的摆布。
 
  安娜·帕夫洛夫娜陷入了沉思。
  “您从来没有想到替您那个浪子阿纳托利娶亲的事么?据说,”她开口说道,“老处女都有为人办婚事的癖性。我还不觉得我自己会有这个弱点,可是我这里有一个少女,她和她父亲相处,极为不幸,她就是博尔孔斯卡娅,我们的一个亲戚,公爵小姐。”尽管瓦西里公爵具备上流社会人士固有的神速的颖悟力和记忆力,但对她的见识他只是摇摇脑袋表示要加以斟酌,并没有作答。
  “不,您是不是知道,这个阿纳托利每年都要花费我四万卢布。”他说道,看来无法遏制他那忧悒的心绪。他沉默了片刻。
  “若是这样拖下去,五年后那会怎样呢?这就是为父的益处。您那个公爵小姐很富有吗?”
  “他父亲很富有,可也很吝啬。他在乡下居住。您知道,这个大名鼎鼎的博尔孔斯基公爵早在已故的皇帝在位时就退休了,他的绰号是‘普鲁士国王’。他是个非常聪明的人,可脾气古怪,难于同他相处。这个可怜的小姐太不幸了,她有个大哥,在当库图佐夫的副官,就在不久前娶上了丽莎·梅南,今天他要上我这儿来。”
  “亲爱的安内特,请听我说吧,”公爵说道,他忽然抓住交谈者的手,不知怎的使它稍微向下弯。“替我办妥这件事,我就永远是您的最忠诚的奴隶——奴力,正如我的一个老农夫在他的报告中所写的。她出身于名门望族,又很富有。这一切都是我所需要的。”
  他的动作灵活、亲昵而优美,可作为他的表征,他抓起宫廷女官的手吻了吻,握着她的手摇晃了几下,伸开手脚懒洋洋地靠在安乐椅上,抬起眼睛向一旁望去。
  “请您等一等,”安娜·帕夫洛夫娜思忖着说道,“我今天跟丽莎——博尔孔斯基的妻子谈谈,也许这事情会办妥的。我要为您家操起老处女的行当了。”
  

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