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解密目标语言:德语                                解密辅助语言:汉语
              Language to be decoded:  German             Auxiliary Language :  Chinese  

  
解密文本:     《少年维特之烦恼》  (歌德著)          
 

 

                                                    
                                                              The Sorrows of Young Werther             
                                                                     by Johann W. Goethe     

                                                            
Book One:  Part1 Part2 Part3 Part4 Part5 

           德汉对照(German & Chinese)                                  德英对照(German & English)                               英汉对照(English & Chinese)


  

 

                             May 4.

 How happy I am that I am gone! My dear friend, what a thing is the heart of man! To leave you, from whom I have been inseparable, whom I love so dearly, and yet to feel happy! I know you will forgive me. Have not other attachments been specially appointed by fate to torment a head like mine? Poor Leonora! and yet I was not to blame. Was it my fault, that, whilst the peculiar charms of her sister afforded me an agreeable entertainment, a passion for me was engendered in her feeble heart? And yet am I wholly blameless? Did I not encourage her emotions? Did I not feel charmed at those truly genuine expressions of nature, which, though but little mirthful in reality, so often amused us? Did I not —but oh! what is man, that he dares so to accuse himself? My dear friend I promise you I will improve; I will no longer, as has ever been my habit, continue to ruminate on every petty vexation which fortune may dispense; I will enjoy the present, and the past shall be for me the past. No doubt you are right, my best of friends, there would be far less suffering amongst mankind, if men — and God knows why they are so fashioned — did not employ their imaginations so assiduously in recalling the memory of past sorrow, instead of bearing their present lot with equanimity.
 
    Be kind enough to inform my mother that I shall attend to her business to the best of my ability, and shall give her the earliest information about it. I have seen my aunt, and find that she is very far from being the disagreeable person our friends allege her to be. She is a lively, cheerful woman, with the best of hearts. I explained to her my mother's wrongs with regard to that part of her portion which has been withheld from her. She told me the motives and reasons of her own conduct, and the terms on which she is willing to give up the whole, and to do more than we have asked. In short, I cannot write further upon this subject at present; only assure my mother that all will go on well. And I have again observed, my dear friend, in this trifling affair, that misunderstandings and neglect occasion more mischief in the world than even malice and wickedness. At all events, the two latter are of less frequent occurrence.

    In other respects I am very well off here. Solitude in this terrestrial paradise is a genial balm to my mind, and the young spring cheers with its bounteous promises my oftentimes misgiving heart. Every tree, every bush, is full of flowers; and one might wish himself transformed into a butterfly, to float about in this ocean of perfume, and find his whole existence in it.

    The town itself is disagreeable; but then, all around, you find an inexpressible beauty of nature. This induced the late Count M to lay out a garden on one of the sloping hills which here intersect each other with the most charming variety, and form the most lovely valleys. The garden is simple; and it is easy to perceive, even upon your first entrance, that the plan was not designed by a scientific gardener, but by a man who wished to give himself up here to the enjoyment of his own sensitive heart. Many a tear have I already shed to the memory of its departed master in a summer-house which is now reduced to ruins, but was his favourite resort, and now is mine. I shall soon be master of the place. The gardener has become attached to me within the last few days, and he will lose nothing thereby.

   

 

                             May 10.

A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely valley teems with vapour around me, and the meridian sun strikes the upper surface of the impenetrable foliage of my trees, and but a few stray gleams steal into the inner sanctuary, I throw myself down among the tall grass by the trickling stream; and, as I lie close to the earth, a thousand unknown plants are noticed by me: when I hear the buzz of the little world among the stalks, and grow familiar with the countless indescribable forms of the insects and flies, then I feel the presence of the Almighty, who formed us in his own image, and the breath of that universal love which bears and sustains us, as it floats around us in an eternity of bliss; and then, my friend, when darkness overspreads my eyes, and heaven and earth seem to dwell in my soul and absorb its power, like the form of a beloved mistress, then I often think with longing, Oh, would I could describe these conceptions, could impress upon paper all that is living so full and warm within me, that it might be the mirror of my soul, as my soul is the mirror of the infinite God! O my friend — but it is too much for my strength — I sink under the weight of the splendour of these visions!

   

 

                           May 12.

I know not whether some deceitful spirits haunt this spot, or whether it be the warm, celestial fancy in my own heart which makes everything around me seem like paradise. In front of the house is a fountain, — a fountain to which I am bound by a charm like Melusina and her sisters. Descending a gentle slope, you come to an arch, where, some twenty steps lower down, water of the clearest crystal gushes from the marble rock. The narrow wall which encloses it above, the tall trees which encircle the spot, and the coolness of the place itself, — everything imparts a pleasant but sublime impression. Not a day passes on which I do not spend an hour there. The young maidens come from the town to fetch water, — innocent and necessary employment, and formerly the occupation of the daughters of kings. As I take my rest there, the idea of the old patriarchal life is awakened around me. I see them, our old ancestors, how they formed their friendships and contracted alliances at the fountain-side; and I feel how fountains and streams were guarded by beneficent spirits. He who is a stranger to these sensations has never really enjoyed cool repose at the side of a fountain after the fatigue of a weary summer day.

 

 

                        May 13.

You ask if you shall send me books. My dear friend, I beseech you, for the love of God, relieve me from such a yoke! I need no more to be guided, agitated, heated. My heart ferments sufficiently of itself. I want strains to lull me, and I find them to perfection in my Homer. Often do I strive to allay the burning fever of my blood; and you have never witnessed anything so unsteady, so uncertain, as my heart. But need I confess this to you, my dear friend, who have so often endured the anguish of witnessing my sudden transitions from sorrow to immoderate joy, and from sweet melancholy to violent passions? I treat my poor heart like a sick child, and gratify its every fancy. Do not mention this again: there are people who would censure me for it.
"

 

 

 

                           May 15.

The common people of the place know me already, and love me, particularly the children. When at first I associated with them, and inquired in a friendly tone about their various trifles, some fancied that I wished to ridicule them, and turned from me in exceeding ill-humour. I did not allow that circumstance to grieve me: I only felt most keenly what I have often before observed.Persons who can claim a certain rank keep themselves coldly aloof from the common people, as though they feared to lose their importance by the contact; whilst wanton idlers, and such as are prone to bad joking, affect to descend to their level, only to make the poor people feel their impertinence all the more keenly.
     I know very well that we are not all equal, nor can be so; but it is my opinion that he who avoids the common people, in order not to lose their respect, is as much to blame as a coward who hides himself from his enemy because he fears defeat.
     The other day I went to the fountain, and found a young servant-girl, who had set her pitcher on the lowest step, and looked around to see if one of her companions was approaching to place it on her head. I ran down, and looked at her. "Shall I help you, pretty lass?" said I. She blushed deeply. "Oh, sir!" she exclaimed. "No ceremony!" I replied. She adjusted her head-gear, and I helped her. She thanked me, and ascended the steps.





 

 

 

 

                        五月四日 

我终于走了,心里好高兴!我的挚友,人的心好生奇怪!离开了你,离开了我如此深爱、简直难以分离的你,我居然会感到高兴!我知道,你会原谅我的。命运偏偏安排我卷入一些感情纠葛之中,不正是为了使我这颗心惶惶终日吗?可怜的莱奥诺蕾!可是这并不是我的过错呀。她妹妹独特的魅力令我赏心惬意,而她那可怜的心儿却对我萌生了恋情,这能怨我吗?不过,我就完全没有责任吗?难道我没有培育她的感情?她吐自肺腑的纯真的言谈原本没有什么可笑,而我们却往往为之开怀大笑,我自己不是也曾以此来逗乐吗?难道我不曾——啊,人呀,自己抱怨一阵又有何用!亲爱的朋友,我向你保证,我要,我要改正,我不会再像往常那样,把命运加给我们的一点儿不幸拿来反复咀嚼;我要享受现时,过去的事就让它过去吧。你说得对,我的挚友,人要是不那么死心眼、不那么执著地去追忆往昔的不幸——上帝知道人为什么这样!——,而是更多地考虑如何对现时处境泰然处之,那么人的苦楚就会小得多。
  

请告诉我母亲,我将很好地办妥她交待的事情,并尽早把消息告诉她。我已经同婶婶谈过了,发现她远非是我们在家里所描画的那种恶女人。她精神焕发,快人快语,心地善良。我告诉她,母亲对她压着那份遗产不分颇有意见;婶婶向我说明了她的理由、原因以及她准备全部交出遗产的条件,这还超出了我们所要求的呢——简言之,我现在不谈这件事,请告诉我母亲,一切都会很好地解决的。我亲爱的朋友,在这件小事情上我又发现,世界上误解和懈怠也许比奸诈和恶意还要误事。至少奸诈和恶意肯定并不多见。
  

此外,我在这里感到很惬意。在这天堂般的地方,寂寞是一剂治我心灵的良药,而这韶华时节正以它明媚的春光温暖着我常常寒颤的心。林木和树篱鲜花盛开,我真想变作金甲虫,遨游于芬芳馥郁的海洋中,尽情摄取种种养分。

 
  城市本身并不宜人,但周围自然风光之绮丽却难以言表。座座小山多姿多彩,纵横交错,形成一个个秀丽的山谷。已故的封M伯爵为之心动,便在一座小山上建起一座花园。花园简朴无华,一进去马上就会感觉到,它不是专业园艺学家设计的,它的图纸显系出自一位感情丰富的人之手,他欲在此排遣自己的情思和寂寞。那座浓荫遮掩的凉亭曾是已故园主人的心爱之所,也是我留连忘返之地,在那里我为那位业已作古的园主人洒了不少眼泪。几天以后我将成为花园的主人;没有几天,园丁就已对我颇有好感,而他也将会得到好处。

 

             五月十日

 我整个灵魂都充满了奇妙的欢快,犹如我以整个心身欣赏的甜美的春晨。我独自一人,在这专为像我那样的人所创造的地方领受着生活的欢欣。我是多么幸福啊,我的挚友,我完全沉浸在宁静生活的感受之中,以至于把自己的艺术也搁置在一边。我现在无法作画,一笔也画不了,和以往相比,此刻我是位更伟大的画家。每当这可爱的山谷里的雾气在我周围蒸腾,太阳高悬在我那片幽暗的树林上空,只有几束阳光悄悄射进树林中的圣地时,我便卧躺在山涧那飞跌而下的溪水边的葳蕤的野草中,挨着地面观察千姿百态的小草;每当我感觉到我的心贴近草丛中麇集扰扰的小世界,贴近各种虫豸蚊蝇千差万别、不可胜数的形状时,我就感到那个照他自己的模样创造我们的全能的上帝的存在,感觉到那个飘逸地将我们带进永恒快乐之中的博爱天父的呼吸;我的朋友,每
当后来我眼前暮色朦胧,我周围的世界以及天空像情人的倩影整个都憩息在我心灵中时,我往往便会生出憧憬,并思忖:啊,你要是能把这一切重现,要是能将你心中如此丰富、如此温馨的情景写在纸上,使之成为你心灵的镜子,犹如你的心灵是博大无垠的上帝的镜子一样,那该多好!——我的朋友——不过,我要是真是这样去做,就必将陨灭,在这些宏伟壮丽的景象的威力下,我定将魂销魄散。

 

                    五月十二日

 

    我不知道,这地方是有迷惑人的精灵在游荡,还是我心里温馨、美妙的奇思异想把我周围的一切变得如伊甸园般的美好。花园前面有一口水井,我像美露茜及其姐妹一样,对这口井着了迷。——走下一座小山,就是一座拱门,再往下走二十级台阶,便有一股清泉从大理石岩缝中喷涌而出。泉水四周砌了矮矮的井栏,大树的浓荫覆盖着周围的地面,凉爽宜人。这一切既让人留连忘返,又令人悚然心悸。我每天都去那儿坐上一小时,一天不落。城里的姑娘都来这儿打水,这是一种最普通、最必需的家务,从前国王的女儿也要亲自操持。每当我坐在那儿,古代宗法社会的情景便会在我眼前浮现:先祖们在水井旁结识、联姻,仁慈的精灵翱翔在水井和清泉的上空。哦,谁要是没有在炎暑劳顿跋涉之后享受了井畔的清凉而感到神清气爽,他对我的体会就不会感同身受。 

    

 

             五月十三日   

你问,要不要把我的书寄来?——亲爱的朋友,我求你看在上帝份上,别让书籍来打扰我!我不想再要什么指导、嘉勉和激励,我这颗心本身就已经够激荡翻腾的了;我需要的是摇篮曲,这我在荷马史诗中已经找到了好多。我常常将它们低声吟诵,以使我极度兴奋的热血冷静下来,因为像我这颗那么变幻无常、捉摸不定的心,你还从未见过呢。亲爱的朋友,你见我由苦闷变为放纵,由甜蜜的忧郁转为伤骨耗精的激情,你在替我担着多大的心,这还用我对你说吗?我自己也把我这颗心当成一个生病的孩子,任其随心所欲。这些情况请不要告诉别人,要不准有人要怪罪我的。


 

              五月十五日   

当地的下层老百姓已经认识我了,并且很喜欢我,尤其是孩子。我来作个有点儿可悲的说明:起先我去接近他们,友好地向他们问这问那,于是有人就以为我是要取笑他们,便粗暴地将我打发走。对此我倒并不生气,只不过我对我以前常说的事有了极其生动的体会:某些稍有地位的人对老百姓总是冷冰冰地采取疏远的态度,他们似乎以为接近老百姓有失他们的身份;还有一些浅薄之辈和捣蛋的家伙,他们做出一副降贵纡尊的姿态,好在穷苦百姓面前更显得鹤立鸡群。我知道,我们并不平等,还不可能平等;但是我却认为,那些以为必须远离所谓群氓以维护自己尊严的人,同那些因为怕吃败仗,所以见了敌人就躲起来的胆小鬼一样,应该受到谴责。
  不久前我去井边,看见一个青年女仆,她将水瓮放在最下面的一级台阶上,正在回头张望,看有没有女伴来帮她把水瓮放到头顶上去。我走下台阶,望着她。“要我帮您吗,姑娘?”我说。——她满脸通红。——“噢,不用,先生!”她说。——“别客气。”——她摆正头上的垫圈,我帮她放上水瓮。她道了谢,便往上走去。


  

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